Health Awareness

​To ensure our families are receiving the appropriate information about mental and physical health and identifying health deficiencies within our community, which may involve food desert issues, the lack of healthy food in our communities, walkability studies, activities transportation issues, etc. Coordination of existing programs that increase awareness of exercise, outdoor activities and healthy eating will be an active portion of our efforts.

​UCP engages, supports, and gives voice to marginalized, low-income and under-served populations through coalition building and community mobilization. Our dynamic network of coalitions is composed of neighborhood leaders, consumer advocates, healthcare, social services, educational and faith-based organizations serving communities in San Diego. 

UCP is grounded by the coalitions and the community-based groups that form the foundation of our work. A series of community interventions provides constant input to identify issues, assess community needs and formulate policy recommendations to transform the conditions in which people live. 

Our Health coalitions and programs fall under three policy areas:

Access & Quality of Healthcare coalitions mobilize community resources 

Community Health & Education, working with local residents and stakeholders, builds and transform community assets for health promotion. The coalitions advocate for preserving and expanding open space, improving the availability and quality of food and physical activity options in one of the nation's most densely-populated and under-resourced metropolitan areas.
Expansion & Quality of Healthcare Coverage supports coalitions at the local, state and national levels to expand healthcare coverage and improve outreach, enrollment, retention and utilization in publicly-sponsored healthcare programs. The touchstone project helps families enroll in and use low-cost health insurance program to reduce the number of uninsured children in SD County. 

SD County Statistics
The need for Fresh food becoming more accessible
collaborating with Project New Village with our first night farmers Market


...there is increasing recognition that many of the individuals have extensive histories of trauma that, left unaddressed, can get in the way of achieving good health and well-being. For example,
a child who suffers from maltreatment or neglect in the home may not be able to concentrate on school work and be successful in school; a women victimized by domestic violence may have trouble performing in the work setting...


Committed to helping our neighborhoods to thrive...
Projects

  • Fresh Food access improvement.
  • Neighborhood Gardens.
  • Community Trauma issues/solutions
  • Improvement of quality and Services from Food 4 Less, (see video)
  • Affordable Health Act Enrollment​
  • Active Resident Leadership program
  • Gathering Places activations
  • Better Blocks SESD
  • Neighborhood Art Projects
Food 4 Less at Market Creek Plaza, 2016. Getting better all the time!
Community Trauma
Introduction; (Taken from a recent white paper on "Community Trauma "The Natl. Child Traumatic Stress Network.)

Trauma is a widespread, harmful and costly public health problem. It occurs as a result of violence, abuse, neglect, loss, disaster, war and other emotionally harmful experiences. Trauma has no boundaries with regard to age, gender, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, geography or sexual orientation. It is an almost universal experience of people with mental and substance use disorders. The need
to address trauma is increasingly viewed as an important component of effective behavioral health service delivery. Additionally, it has become evident that addressing trauma requires a multi-pronged, multi-agency public health approach inclusive of public education and awareness, prevention and early identification, and effective trauma-specific assessment and treatment. In order to maximize the impact of these efforts, they need to be provided in an organizational or community context that is trauma-informed, that is, based on the knowledge and understanding of trauma and its far-reaching implications.
supports and intervention, people can overcome traumatic experiences.However, most people go without these services and supports. Unaddressed trauma significantly increases the risk of mental
and substance use disorders and chronic physical diseases.
The effects of traumatic events place a heavy burden on individuals, families and communities and create challenges for public institutions and service systems. Although many people who experience
a traumatic event will go on with their lives without lasting negative effects, others will have more difficulty and experience traumatic stress reactions. Emerging research has documented the relationships among exposure to traumatic events, impaired neurodevelopmental and immune systems responses and subsequent health risk behaviors resulting in chronic physical or behavioral health disorders.Research has also indicated that with appropriate. Individuals with experiences of trauma are found
in multiple service sectors, not just in behavioral health. Studies of people in the juvenile and criminal justice system reveal high rates of mental and substance use disorders and personal histories of trauma. Children and families in the child welfare system similarly experience high rates of trauma and associated behavioral health problems. Young people bring their experiences of trauma into the school systems, often interfering with their school success. And many patients in primary care similarly have significant trauma histories which has an impact on their health and their responsiveness to health interventions.
In addition, the public institutions and service systems that are intended to provide services and supports
to individuals are often themselves trauma-inducing. The use of coercive practices, such as seclusion and restraints, in the behavioral health system; the abrupt removal of a child from an abusing family in the child welfare system; the use of invasive procedures in the medical system; the harsh disciplinary practices in educational/school systems; or intimidating practices in the criminal justice system can be re-traumatizing for individuals who already enter these systems
with significant histories of trauma. These program or system practices and policies often interfere with achieving the desired outcomes in these systems.
With appropriate supports and intervention, people can overcome traumatic experiences.
The need to address trauma is increasingly viewed as an important component of effective behavioral health service delivery.

In public institutions and service systems, there is increasing recognition that many of the individuals have extensive histories of trauma that, left unaddressed, can get in the way of achieving good health and well-being. For example,
a child who suffers from maltreatment or neglect in the home may not be able to concentrate on school work and be successful in school; a women victimized by domestic violence may have trouble performing in the work setting; a jail inmate repeatedly exposed to violence on the street may have difficulty refraining from retaliatory violence and re-offending; a sexually abused homeless youth may engage in self-injury and high risk behaviors to cope with the effects of sexual abuse; and, a veteran may use substances to mask the traumatic memories of combat. The experiences of these individuals are compelling and, unfortunately, all too common. Yet, until recently, gaining a better understanding of how to address the trauma
experienced by these individuals and how to mitigate the re-traumatizing effect of many of our public institutions and service settings was not an integral part of the work of these systems. Now, however, there is an increasing focus on the impact of trauma and how service systems may help to resolve or exacerbate trauma-related issues. These systems are beginning to revisit how they conduct their “business” under the framework of a trauma-informed approach.

Food Desert Map in SESD
Food 4 Less 2014